Monuments

Starting in the first century BC, the emperor Augustus and then his successors bestowed Nîmes with sumptuous monuments. Nîmes was given the status of 'colony under Latin law' and became a spearhead for the promotion of romanity in Gaul.

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Monuments

The Roman Arena

The Roman amphitheatre (or arena) in Nîmes is the best-conserved of the Roman world. It was used for hunting wild animals and for gladiator combats from the end of the first century AD onwards. Many events are held there today.

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The Maison Carrée

Built at the very beginning of our era and dedicated to Caius and Lucius Cesar, the adopted son and grandson of the Emperor Augustus, the Maison Carrée was part of the forum, the economic and administrative heart of the Roman town.

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The Jardins de la Fontaine

Decorated with vases and statues, the Jardins de la Fontaine count as one of the major public gardens in Europe. They were laid out in the eighteenth century on the site of the ancient spring, an area that includes the Tour Magne and the Temple of Diana.

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The gates of the Roman town

Porte Auguste and Porte de France are the only gates of the Augustan enclosure remaining visible, ...

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The Castellum

An extremely rare vestige of the Roman world (this is one of two still in this condition, the other being in Pompeii)...

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The Temple de Diane

Its precise function is not known but it is the most romantic and also the most enigmatic monument in Nîmes—doubtless linked with the imperial sanctuary.

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Tour Magne

Visible from a distance, it indicated the presence of the city and of the Imperial temple located...

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